Тема: New Releases from NCBI Bookshelf

1. Am J Hum Genet. 1980 May;32(3):314-31. Construction of a genetic linkage map in man using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Botstein D, White.

Too far away to put a smile on your face.

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

The NHLBI Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies was held July 12, 2004 in Bethesda, MD. Working group members included experts from scientific, medical and public health communities, and persons with expertise in ethical, legal, and social issues. The main objective of this working group was to discuss and make recommendations for reporting individual results from genetic tests to participants of Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep research studies involving genetics.

Final decisions regarding reporting of research results should not be made by the investigator alone, and should be done only with IRB approval after careful consideration of risks and benefits.

Information for Researchers and Health Care Professionals
A fact sheet from NHGRI and the Department of Health and Human Services that explains the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) so that investigators and researchers can understand the law and its prohibitions related to discrimination in health coverage and employment based on genetic information.

Read more: President Bush Signs H.R. 493, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008
[georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov]

Canine Disease, Coat Color, Breed Identification, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage, OFA Registry. Equine Disease, Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage. Feline Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage.

We know that aging is influenced by how genetic and environmental factors interact, with genetics contributing substantially to healthy aging and exceptional longevity in people in current environments.

Today we have new opportunities to study these genetic factors, spurred by new initiatives in NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology. We have developed a research program on the translation of genetic factors associated with longevity, giving us the chance to translate these insights into new therapeutic targets to promote healthy aging. The hope is to use the insight from genetics to develop a drug or other intervention that can mimic the effect of a favorable variation.

It is important for people considering genetic testing to know whether the test is available on a clinical or research basis. Clinical and research testing both involve a process of informed consent in which patients learn about the testing procedure, the risks and benefits of the test, and the potential consequences of testing.

The Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center describes the difference between clinical and research genetic testing .

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

The NHLBI Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies was held July 12, 2004 in Bethesda, MD. Working group members included experts from scientific, medical and public health communities, and persons with expertise in ethical, legal, and social issues. The main objective of this working group was to discuss and make recommendations for reporting individual results from genetic tests to participants of Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep research studies involving genetics.

Final decisions regarding reporting of research results should not be made by the investigator alone, and should be done only with IRB approval after careful consideration of risks and benefits.

Information for Researchers and Health Care Professionals
A fact sheet from NHGRI and the Department of Health and Human Services that explains the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) so that investigators and researchers can understand the law and its prohibitions related to discrimination in health coverage and employment based on genetic information.

Read more: President Bush Signs H.R. 493, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008
[georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov]

Canine Disease, Coat Color, Breed Identification, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage, OFA Registry. Equine Disease, Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage. Feline Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage.

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

The NHLBI Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies was held July 12, 2004 in Bethesda, MD. Working group members included experts from scientific, medical and public health communities, and persons with expertise in ethical, legal, and social issues. The main objective of this working group was to discuss and make recommendations for reporting individual results from genetic tests to participants of Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep research studies involving genetics.

Final decisions regarding reporting of research results should not be made by the investigator alone, and should be done only with IRB approval after careful consideration of risks and benefits.

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

The NHLBI Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies was held July 12, 2004 in Bethesda, MD. Working group members included experts from scientific, medical and public health communities, and persons with expertise in ethical, legal, and social issues. The main objective of this working group was to discuss and make recommendations for reporting individual results from genetic tests to participants of Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep research studies involving genetics.

Final decisions regarding reporting of research results should not be made by the investigator alone, and should be done only with IRB approval after careful consideration of risks and benefits.

Information for Researchers and Health Care Professionals
A fact sheet from NHGRI and the Department of Health and Human Services that explains the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) so that investigators and researchers can understand the law and its prohibitions related to discrimination in health coverage and employment based on genetic information.

Read more: President Bush Signs H.R. 493, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008
[georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov]

Canine Disease, Coat Color, Breed Identification, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage, OFA Registry. Equine Disease, Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage. Feline Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage.

We know that aging is influenced by how genetic and environmental factors interact, with genetics contributing substantially to healthy aging and exceptional longevity in people in current environments.

Today we have new opportunities to study these genetic factors, spurred by new initiatives in NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology. We have developed a research program on the translation of genetic factors associated with longevity, giving us the chance to translate these insights into new therapeutic targets to promote healthy aging. The hope is to use the insight from genetics to develop a drug or other intervention that can mimic the effect of a favorable variation.

It is important for people considering genetic testing to know whether the test is available on a clinical or research basis. Clinical and research testing both involve a process of informed consent in which patients learn about the testing procedure, the risks and benefits of the test, and the potential consequences of testing.

The Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center describes the difference between clinical and research genetic testing .

8

On a plus side Olivia me her daddy Peter have had a great weekend with Teresa, Bruce, Shannen James.

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

The NHLBI Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies was held July 12, 2004 in Bethesda, MD. Working group members included experts from scientific, medical and public health communities, and persons with expertise in ethical, legal, and social issues. The main objective of this working group was to discuss and make recommendations for reporting individual results from genetic tests to participants of Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep research studies involving genetics.

Final decisions regarding reporting of research results should not be made by the investigator alone, and should be done only with IRB approval after careful consideration of risks and benefits.

Information for Researchers and Health Care Professionals
A fact sheet from NHGRI and the Department of Health and Human Services that explains the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) so that investigators and researchers can understand the law and its prohibitions related to discrimination in health coverage and employment based on genetic information.

Read more: President Bush Signs H.R. 493, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008
[georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov]

10

I tweet you. I"m just not on here as much because I have a lot going on right now.

11

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

12

Genetics is the study of genes , genetic variation , and heredity in living organisms. [1] [2] It is generally considered a field of biology , but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems.

The father of genetics is Gregor Mendel , a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied "trait inheritance", patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete "units of inheritance". This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene.

Many Americans fear that participating in research or undergoing genetic testing will lead to being discriminated against based on their genetics. Such fears may dissuade patients from taking genomics-based clinical tests or volunteering to participate in the research necessary for the development of new tests, therapies, and cures.

To address this, in 2008 the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) was passed into law, prohibiting discrimination by employers and health insurers. There are also other legal protections against genetic discrimination by employers, health insurers, and others.

The NHLBI Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies was held July 12, 2004 in Bethesda, MD. Working group members included experts from scientific, medical and public health communities, and persons with expertise in ethical, legal, and social issues. The main objective of this working group was to discuss and make recommendations for reporting individual results from genetic tests to participants of Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep research studies involving genetics.

Final decisions regarding reporting of research results should not be made by the investigator alone, and should be done only with IRB approval after careful consideration of risks and benefits.

Information for Researchers and Health Care Professionals
A fact sheet from NHGRI and the Department of Health and Human Services that explains the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) so that investigators and researchers can understand the law and its prohibitions related to discrimination in health coverage and employment based on genetic information.

Read more: President Bush Signs H.R. 493, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008
[georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov]

Canine Disease, Coat Color, Breed Identification, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage, OFA Registry. Equine Disease, Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage. Feline Coat Color, Profiling/Parentage, DNA Storage.

We know that aging is influenced by how genetic and environmental factors interact, with genetics contributing substantially to healthy aging and exceptional longevity in people in current environments.

Today we have new opportunities to study these genetic factors, spurred by new initiatives in NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology. We have developed a research program on the translation of genetic factors associated with longevity, giving us the chance to translate these insights into new therapeutic targets to promote healthy aging. The hope is to use the insight from genetics to develop a drug or other intervention that can mimic the effect of a favorable variation.

13

Outside of family/faith, hold very few things sacred. Putting everything else on the table for discussion is a sign of strong/even views.