Тема: What is the difference between working for a big and a small management consulting firm?

"McKinsey trained me how to work with CEOs and senior leaders so they treat you and see you as a peer. I also learned business judgment, analytical, and problem.

What a STUPID question! You ought to be at the problem-solving phase by now which would entail evicting Leftists from your government first.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

Problem solvers and creative thinkers. Engineers and new business builders. Put your talents to use where opportunities are limitless and every day makes a difference.

Whether you’re an experienced professional or a recent graduate, working with McKinsey could be a challenging and rewarding next step in your career.

This option allows the site to remember your user name. It also provides extended access to the content section of the Website, but not to the directory or the professional profile board. It will be deactivated once you sign out from the Website.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is among the most difficult standardised tests you will likely take in your lifetime. It is therefore worthwhile spending time understanding the basics of the test and learning preparation techniques from those who have succeeded. Here are the nine things you need to know about the test:

The PST is a pen-and-paper test used by McKinsey after screening CVs, and before the first round of case interviews. While it is designed to test your numerical computation and logic skills, it is not designed to test either your memory skills or your business knowledge as outlined in McKinsey’s coaching guide.  

Why is it important to learn problem-solving skills? Because we all have to make decisions. Whether you''re a student, a parent, a businessperson, or the president of the United States, you face problems every day that need solving. Maybe you''re trying to save your company, keep your job, or end the world financial crisis. Maybe you simply need to eat better or find more time to spend with your family.

Whether the issue is big or small, we all set goals for ourselves, face challenges, and strive to overcome them. But what you might not know is there''s an easy way to consistently arrive at effective and satisfying solutions. There''s a universal and fundamental approach to solving problems, but chances are no one has ever bothered to show you how.

Naboang kos problem solving

Trigo, algebra and problem solving

6

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

Problem solvers and creative thinkers. Engineers and new business builders. Put your talents to use where opportunities are limitless and every day makes a difference.

Whether you’re an experienced professional or a recent graduate, working with McKinsey could be a challenging and rewarding next step in your career.

This option allows the site to remember your user name. It also provides extended access to the content section of the Website, but not to the directory or the professional profile board. It will be deactivated once you sign out from the Website.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is among the most difficult standardised tests you will likely take in your lifetime. It is therefore worthwhile spending time understanding the basics of the test and learning preparation techniques from those who have succeeded. Here are the nine things you need to know about the test:

The PST is a pen-and-paper test used by McKinsey after screening CVs, and before the first round of case interviews. While it is designed to test your numerical computation and logic skills, it is not designed to test either your memory skills or your business knowledge as outlined in McKinsey’s coaching guide.  

Why is it important to learn problem-solving skills? Because we all have to make decisions. Whether you're a student, a parent, a businessperson, or the president of the United States, you face problems every day that need solving. Maybe you're trying to save your company, keep your job, or end the world financial crisis. Maybe you simply need to eat better or find more time to spend with your family.

Whether the issue is big or small, we all set goals for ourselves, face challenges, and strive to overcome them. But what you might not know is there's an easy way to consistently arrive at effective and satisfying solutions. There's a universal and fundamental approach to solving problems, but chances are no one has ever bothered to show you how.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

Problem solvers and creative thinkers. Engineers and new business builders. Put your talents to use where opportunities are limitless and every day makes a difference.

Whether you’re an experienced professional or a recent graduate, working with McKinsey could be a challenging and rewarding next step in your career.

This option allows the site to remember your user name. It also provides extended access to the content section of the Website, but not to the directory or the professional profile board. It will be deactivated once you sign out from the Website.

8

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

Problem solvers and creative thinkers. Engineers and new business builders. Put your talents to use where opportunities are limitless and every day makes a difference.

Whether you’re an experienced professional or a recent graduate, working with McKinsey could be a challenging and rewarding next step in your career.

This option allows the site to remember your user name. It also provides extended access to the content section of the Website, but not to the directory or the professional profile board. It will be deactivated once you sign out from the Website.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is among the most difficult standardised tests you will likely take in your lifetime. It is therefore worthwhile spending time understanding the basics of the test and learning preparation techniques from those who have succeeded. Here are the nine things you need to know about the test:

The PST is a pen-and-paper test used by McKinsey after screening CVs, and before the first round of case interviews. While it is designed to test your numerical computation and logic skills, it is not designed to test either your memory skills or your business knowledge as outlined in McKinsey’s coaching guide.  

Why is it important to learn problem-solving skills? Because we all have to make decisions. Whether you''''re a student, a parent, a businessperson, or the president of the United States, you face problems every day that need solving. Maybe you''''re trying to save your company, keep your job, or end the world financial crisis. Maybe you simply need to eat better or find more time to spend with your family.

Whether the issue is big or small, we all set goals for ourselves, face challenges, and strive to overcome them. But what you might not know is there''''s an easy way to consistently arrive at effective and satisfying solutions. There''''s a universal and fundamental approach to solving problems, but chances are no one has ever bothered to show you how.

10

Demonstrates problem solving skills and an ability to understand abstract concepts? All employable skills.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

12

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

Problem solvers and creative thinkers. Engineers and new business builders. Put your talents to use where opportunities are limitless and every day makes a difference.

Whether you’re an experienced professional or a recent graduate, working with McKinsey could be a challenging and rewarding next step in your career.

This option allows the site to remember your user name. It also provides extended access to the content section of the Website, but not to the directory or the professional profile board. It will be deactivated once you sign out from the Website.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is among the most difficult standardised tests you will likely take in your lifetime. It is therefore worthwhile spending time understanding the basics of the test and learning preparation techniques from those who have succeeded. Here are the nine things you need to know about the test:

The PST is a pen-and-paper test used by McKinsey after screening CVs, and before the first round of case interviews. While it is designed to test your numerical computation and logic skills, it is not designed to test either your memory skills or your business knowledge as outlined in McKinsey’s coaching guide.  

13

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test (also known as the McKinsey PST) is a math computation, data interpretation and logical thinking test used by McKinsey to determine which candidates are granted a first round case interview. In general, candidates whose resumes McKinsey deems acceptable are invited to take the test. Based on feedback from hundreds of test takers, you must pass the test in order to get the interview. There are few to no exceptions to this rule.

The reason McKinsey uses the test is because there are a certain set of numerical computation and logical thinking skills required to be successful in consulting. While standardized math tests like the quantitative sections of the SAT, GRE, or GMAT do test math computational skills, it is possible to get perfect scores on these math tests but fail on the job in consulting.

The McKinsey Problem Solving Test is a case based test which consists of 26 multiple-choice questions and lasts around 60 minutes. It is based on real scenarios of McKinsey clients in order to help the company gage your ability to solve the business problems that their clients regularly face. The written test is considered to be one of the most difficult parts of the interview process.

This is why Consulting Guru has created their own, unique McKinsey Problem Solving Practice Test. With a team of PhD’s from the top universities, Consulting Guru has created a variety of practice tests designed to help you prepare for the McKinsey PST in a thorough and professional manner.

Rob McEwen had a problem. The chairman and chief executive officer of Canadian mining group Goldcorp knew that its Red Lake site could be a money-spinner—a mine nearby was thriving—but no one could figure out where to find high-grade ore. The terrain was inaccessible, operating costs were high, and the unionized staff had already gone on strike. In short, McEwen was lumbered with a gold mine that wasn’t a gold mine.

Imagine a map of all of the people you know, ranked by their influence over you. It would show close friends and vague acquaintances, colleagues at work and college roommates, people who could affect your career dramatically and people who have no bearing on it. All of them would be connected by relationships of trust, friendship, influence, and the probabilities that they will meet. Such a map is a network that can represent anything from groups of people to interacting product parts to traffic patterns within a city—and therefore can shape a whole range of business problems.

Problem solvers and creative thinkers. Engineers and new business builders. Put your talents to use where opportunities are limitless and every day makes a difference.

Whether you’re an experienced professional or a recent graduate, working with McKinsey could be a challenging and rewarding next step in your career.

14

The #1 site on the web for McKinsey Problem Solving practice tests. Give yourself a head start with Consulting Guru’s free PST sample today!

Team players A consultant is someone who takes the watch off your wrist then tells you the time, comes in to solve a problem then stays around long enough to become part of it, is called in at the last moment and paid vast amounts of money to assign blame. Jokes aside, it can be tricky to define exactly what consultants do. To the uninitiated, consultants can appear to be trying to be all things to all men – and women – when consulting firms actually come in lots of different shapes and sizes. But if you like the idea of working in consultancy and are trying to decide where to focus your efforts, it is useful to know that most consulting firms fall into one of three main groups. The first comprises management and strategic consulting specialists, such as McKinsey and Co or OC&C, which offer purely management consulting across a wide range of industries. The second group contains more diversified organisations, such as Accenture, Deloitte, and IBM, which offer services such as IT consulting in addition to more general management consulting. Third, there are organisations that focus their efforts in particular sectors, such as First Manhattan (financial services) and Gleeds (building and construction), or restrict their consulting to specific areas such as business process outsourcing. All of these organisations employ finance professionals in various capacities, so there are lots of opportunities for ambitious ACCAs. ‘Some years are boom years and others are not, but the consulting industry has grown consistently over the past decade,’ says Fiona Czemiawska, a researcher with the Management Consulting Association. ‘Financial services is one of the big growth areas at the moment,’ she says, and there are lots of opportunities for ambitious accountants – but only if you have the necessary specialist expertise. Do you want to grow? ‘A lot of the growth in consulting has been driven by increased regulation,’ explains Czemiawska, ‘so you need to know your way around issues such as Basel II and IFRS.’ Technology-driven change is also significant. ‘Many finance institutions are facing big operational and strategic challenges in areas such as e-commerce,’ adds Czemiawska, so finance professionals with expertise in this area are also in high demand. Other areas showing significant growth include financial shared service centres, technology shared service centres, outsourcing (locally and across international borders), and public–private partnerships. ‘Governments across the world are all trying to get as much as they can for the public money they spend, so there is a lot going on in this area,’ says Courteney Collins, a board member with Gleeds international consultancy. Although Gleeds services the building and construction industries, it has a VAT division and so tax specialists are much sought after, particularly if they can offer more than just finance skills. ‘Accountants tend to be well respected because of their finance qualification,’ says Collins. And if they can supplement this professional knowledge with experience of working in business, or a particular industry, or boast language skills, then this can help ease the transition into consulting. Your training as an accountant is also a mark of quality, according to Rob Hortop, an accountant who is now a principal consultant with the finance transformation group at PA Consulting Group. ‘I think people respect the profession,’ he says. When Hortop talks to clients about finance change programmes, they often ask whether he is an accountant. ‘They want to be sure that I understand their position and really know what I’m doing,’ he explains, ‘while they simply assume I have the necessary consulting skills.’ Hortop worked in consulting at PricewaterhouseCoopers not long after qualifying, and then spent four years working in industry before re-entering consulting at PA. Although he says the organisations are ‘not hugely dissimilar’, the way he feels about working as a consultant has certainly changed. ‘After a few years of building experiences I was able to integrate more easily and add value right away,’ he says. If you want to be able to do this too, grab any opportunity you can to work in project roles, or take on temporary secondments. ‘You need to get as much experience as you can,’ he says. Work on systems implementations, learn how to train and coach people, lead workshops, and so on, he suggests, so that you can really add value to an organisation. Do you want to be challenged? Being a consultant is about more than having the right experience, qualifications, and skills – firms are looking for some very particular qualities in their employees. ‘Everything about being an accounting consultant is challenging,’ says Homayoun Hatami, an associate principal with McKinsey, ‘so you have to think carefully about whether it is right for you, and if you are right for it.’ In common with many other consulting firms, McKinsey forms teams based on the needs of the client and the project in hand, so those involved need to be effective communicators who can rapidly read both people and a situation. It isn’t unusual for consultants to work closely with people for the duration of a project, but never see them again afterwards: McKinsey, for example, has a global presence with 84 offices and an international client base. ‘On one occasion in Brussels, I met the other members of the team three or four hours before we went to meet the client,’ says Hatami. None of them had ever met before and had travelled to Belgium from the US, Norway, and the Czech Republic, but as he adds: ‘The client had the impression that we had been a team all of our lives.’ Although travel is not compulsory, it is an important part of the job. ‘The best answers are found when you work with the client,’ says Hatami, ‘and that means spending day in day out with them, wherever they are.’ Do you want autonomy? Above a certain level you tend to have a very packed agenda and work a lot. ‘Most of my friends work as hard as I do,’ says Hatami. How hard you work will definitely be a factor in your success, but it will be largely up to you. If you are at your most comfortable when someone else is setting the agenda, consulting could be your worst nightmare. ‘You need to be self-motivated and self-sufficient,’ suggests Tom Bangermann, a vice president with the Hackett Group, a consultancy specialising in the finance function. ‘You need to be relatively independent and capable of organising yourself,’ he says, ‘and when you are given a task you should just go away and get on with it.’ According to Bangermann, Hackett gives even its junior staff a high degree of autonomy but they are expected to use it constructively. ‘You are given the freedom to make decisions and you need to use it,’ he explains, adding: ‘If you want to work as part of a five-person team on a clearly defined boxed-in activity, then this is not the place for you.’ Hatami’s experience also reflects this. ‘McKinsey has no fixed organisational structure, so I don’t report to anybody,’ he explains, a situation he found difficult as a new employee. ‘I was used to having a boss and being told what to do most of the time,’ but as a consultant he had to find his own way. ‘I was waiting for people to tell me what to do, but I needed to take charge of myself and find what was interesting to me,’ he says, adding: ‘I had to make a significant contribution. I couldn’t just ride the wave.’ As a consultant, Hatami has nowhere to hide. ‘I miss those days when I used to be able to go to the office and say: “You know what, I just don’t feel like it today,”’ something he could occasionally do with his previous employers. As a consultant, this never happens. ‘There is a culture of performance,’ confirms Hortop. ‘You are accountable for all your hours and you have to make every minute count.’